Archive for the ‘All-Time Rankings’ Category

10: Greatest Boxers from the United Kingdom   Leave a comment

  1. Bob Fitzsimmons
  2. Jimmy Wilde
  3. Jimmy McLarnin
  4. Ted ‘Kid’ Lewis
  5. Lennox Lewis
  6. Freddie Welsh
  7. Jack ‘Kid’ Berg
  8. Ken Buchanan
  9. Benny Lynch
  10. Randy Turpin

Benny Lynch [#9]

While batting well under .500 in the knockout department, Lynch was said to punch far above his weight class. He selectively put that power to good use and stopped most of his best opponents. Unfortunately fame and fortune eventually led to excessive partying and he jumped from flyweight to lightweight in the span of 1 year. At lightweight he was knocked out for the first/last time of his career and was forced into retirement. The alcoholism that cut his career short ultimately took his life at only 33 years of age.

Record: 88-14-17, 34 KO

World Championship Reign: Undisputed flyweight title (September 9, 1935 to June 29, 1938)

World Champions (*) / Hall of Famers (^) Defeated: Valentin Angelmann*, Jackie Brown*, Small Montana*, Peter Kane*

Lynch additionally beat Jackie Jurich, whom also beat world champs and HOFers despite not reaching the same accolades.

Bob Fitzsimmons [#1]

Fitzsimmons was the first 3 division world champion and the only man to win world titles at middleweight, light heavyweight and heavyweight until Roy Jones Jr did it 100 years later. But Jones never held the true title at middleweight or heavyweight like Fitz!

Record: 63-8-4, 59 KO (26 ND)

World Championship Reign: Undisputed middleweight title (January 14, 1891 to sometime in 1895 [vacated]), Undisputed heavyweight title (March 17, 1897 to June 9, 1899), Undisputed light heavyweight title (November 25, 1903 to December 20, 1905)

World Champions (*) / Hall of Famers (^) Defeated: Nonpareil Jack Dempsey*^, Peter Maher* (heavyweight title claimant), Joe Choynski^, James J. Corbett*^, Tom Sharkey^, Philadelphia Jack O’Brien*^

Freddie Welsh [#6]

Nicknamed “The Welsh Wizard,” Freddie was arguably the greatest defensive fighter the UK has ever produced. Factoring in newspaper decisions for his plethora of “no decision” bouts, Welsh won over 120 fights, beating a few great fighters in their primes and drawing with Packey McFarland twice.

Record: 74-5-7, 34 KO (81 ND)

World Championship Reign: Undisputed lightweight title (July 7, 1914 to May 28, 1917)

World Champions (*) / Hall of Famers (^) Defeated: Abe Attell*^, Jim Driscoll^, Willie Ritchie*^, Johnny Dundee*^, Ad Wolgast*^, Benny Leonard*^, Battling Nelson*^

Jack ‘Kid’ Berg [#7]

Berg was history’s 3rd junior welterweight world champion and the first of which to be inducted into the IBHOF. What Berg lacked in polish, he made up for in strategy and consistency. His resume is truly admirable.

Record: 157-26-9, 51 KO

World Championship Reign: Undisputed junior welterweight title (February 18, 1930 to April 24, 1931)

World Champions (*) / Hall of Famers (^) Defeated: Andre Routis*, Mushy Callahan*^, Tony Canzoneri*^, Kid Chocolate*^, Billy Petrolle^, Tippy Larkin*^

Jimmy McLarnin [#3]

McLarnin began his career at flyweight, fought all the way through welterweight, and beat former/current/future world champions in each weight class. He also beat at least 12 Hall of Famers, 2 of which came in his final 2 fights.

Record: 55-11-3, 21 KO

World Championship Reign: Undisputed welterweight title (May 29, 1933 to May 28, 1934 & September 17, 1934 to May 28, 1935)

World Champions (*) / Hall of Famers (^) Defeated: Fidel LaBarba*^, Pancho Villa*^, Jackie Fields*^, Charles ‘Bud’ Taylor*^, Louis ‘Kid’ Kaplan*^, Sammy Mandell*^, Billy Petrolle^, Benny Leonard*^, Young Corbett III*^, Barney Ross*^, Tony Canzoneri*^, Lou Ambers*^

Jimmy Wilde [#2]

Wilde spent most of his prime years weighing under 100 lbs despite flyweight (112 lbs) being the smallest weight class in boxing at the time. If there were no boundaries on how small weight classes could be, Wilde would have been 4-5 weight classes beneath his competition. Nonetheless, Wilde nearly notched 100 knockouts in his career, the 14th most in boxing history and the most beneath the featherweight (126 lbs) division.

Record: 132-3-1, 99 KO (15 ND)

World Championship Reign: Undisputed flyweight title (February 14, 1916 to June 18, 1923)

World Champions (*) / Hall of Famers (^) Defeated: Sid Smith*, Joe Symonds*, Tancy Lee*, Joe Lynch*^, Memphis Pal Moore*^ (bantamweight title claimant)

Ken Buchanan [#8]

More people would probably recognize Buchanan as a great fighter if he wasn’t best known for getting thrashed by Roberto Duran. Duran was a hungry, 28-0 young lion at the time. Buchanan was just in the wrong place at the wrong time. He had better technical skills than multiple people rated above him in this top 10 list.

Record: 61-8, 27 KO

World Championship Reign: Undisputed lightweight title (September 26, 1970 to June, 1971), WBA lightweight title (September 26, 1970 to June 26, 1972)

World Champions (*) / Hall of Famers (^) Defeated: Ismael Laguna*^, Carlos Hernandez*, Carlos Ortiz*^, Jim Watt*

Lennox Lewis [#5]

Among heavyweight champions, few can claim they’ve beaten every man they’ve ever faced. It took 3 rematches, but L. Lewis is on that short list. He was also the second British-born fighter to win a world heavyweight title and all he had to do was collect it out of a garbage can, left there by another man (Riddick Bowe) on the short list previously referenced. This also made Lewis the second man (after Ken Norton) to acquire the WBC heavyweight title without winning it in the ring. Fortunately his other title wins were more dignified and he ultimately became one of the few 3-time heavyweight champs.

Record: 41-2-1, 32 KO

World Championship Reign: WBC heavyweight title (December 14, 1992 to September 24, 1994 & February 7, 1997 to April 22, 2001 & November 17, 2001 to February 6, 2004), WBA heavyweight title (November 13, 1999 to April 29, 2000), IBF heavyweight title (November 13, 1999 to April 22, 2001 & November 17, 2001 to September 5, 2002), IBO heavyweight title (November 13, 1999 to April 22, 2001 & November 17, 2001 to February 6, 2004), Lineal heavyweight title (March 28, 1998 to April 22, 2001 & November 17, 2001 to February 6, 2004)

World Champions (*) / Hall of Famers (^) Defeated: Ossie Ocasio*, Mike Weaver*, Tony Tucker*, Frank Bruno*, Tommy Morrison* [WBO champ], Ray Mercer* [WBO champ], Oliver McCall*, Henry Akinwande* [WBO champ], Shannon Briggs*, Evander Holyfield*^, Hasim Rahman*, Mike Tyson*^, *Vitali Klitschko [might make IBHOF someday]

Randy Turpin [#10]

Turpin was just the second man to defeat Sugar Ray Robinson. And even though Turpin lost the rematch, Robinson was not inclined to make a trilogy out of it. Turpin controlled the latter stages of the 2nd fight and nearly stopped Robinson on cuts before Robinson swiftly changed the tide at the end of the 10th round. Aside from passing out due to heat exhaustion against Joey Maxim, this was arguably the closest Sugar Ray ever came to being stopped.

Record: 66-8-1, 45 KOs

World Championship Reign: Undisputed middleweight title (July 10, 1951 to September 12, 1951)

World Champions (*) / Hall of Famers (^) Defeated: Sugar Ray Robinson*^

Ted ‘Kid’ Lewis [#4]

T. Lewis is probably the only fighter in history with over 300 bouts that notched victories from flyweight to light heavyweight. In any event, well over 200 of those bouts were wins, official or otherwise. Not bad for a guy that was only 5′ 7½″. Lewis is best known for his 20 fight series with Jack Britton. Myth: Tom Gunner weighed 200 lbs when Lewis smashed him in 1 round. Reality: Gummer was a middleweight.

Record: 192-32-14, 80 KO (64 ND)

World Championship Reign: Undisputed welterweight title (August 31, 1915 to April 24, 1916 & June 25, 1917 to March 17, 1919)

World Champions (*) / Hall of Famers (^) Defeated: Jack Britton*^, Willie Ritchie*^, Mike Glover*, Mike O’Dowd*^

Runners-up (alphabetical order): Chris Eubank, Jack Broughton, Jim Driscoll, Joe Calzaghe, Naseem Hamed, Nigel Benn, Owen Moran

Notes:

  • HOFers listed from IBHOF & WBHF
  • WBO title was not recognized during Lennox Lewis’ reign
  • Title claimants in old days are tantamount to interim champions today, except there was only 1 title to claim instead of 4+

—————

Ryan Bivins is a professional boxer, the creator of Sweet Boxing Ratings, and a member of the voting panel for the Pennsylvania Boxing Hall of Fame. You may email him at rgbivins@gmail.com and listen to him Tuesday nights on The Ruckus, part of the BadCulture Radio Network.

Greatest Knockout Records of All-Time   Leave a comment

Before we get started let the record show that statistics are far from the be-all-end-all when it comes to greatness. Some say numbers don’t lie, but in boxing they surely do. You see, there are no minor leagues in boxing. Talent at the top of the sport regularly competes with talent at the bottom. Subsequently stats can become quite misleading. For example:

Most consecutive knockouts: LaMar Clark (41 to 44, depending on the source)
Most consecutive first-round knockouts: Ali Raymi (21)

Neither Clark nor Raymi are deserving of accolades despite setting world records. If you saw them fight or knew the opponents that they faced, you’d know why. However, guys like Clark and Raymi are generally exceptions in boxing. Fighters that mediocre rarely get the kind of backing required to make such farcical careers a reality. Usually, exceptional knockout artists are fairly respectable.

But not even the greatest knockout punchers necessarily have standout KO streaks or totals. Joe Louis, for instance, was rated the greatest puncher of all time by RING Magazine in 2003. He had impressive but not glaring stats (at least compared to the data collected here). His longest KO streak was 7 (achieved multiple times). His longest first-round KO streak was 3 (achieved once). And he had a total of 52 KOs, 12 of which came in the first round.

On the other hand, Louis did knockout nearly all of his best opponents (save Tommy Farr and a few great fighters Louis fought after coming out of retirement due to tax problems). When you’ve sparked Primo Carnera, Paulino Uzcudun, John Henry Lewis, Max Baer, Jimmy Braddock, Max Schmeling, Billy Conn, and Jersey Joe Walcott, you’re obviously a great puncher (Jack Sharkey excluded because he was washed up).

That being said, rating knockouts purely by the numbers is just a lot easier and far less subjective. Consider it a method of narrowing the field, so to speak. Below you’ll find a compilation of the greatest numerical knockout records in the sport. Numbers with carrots (^) by them cannot be “verified by BoxRec” and probably come from the 1986-1987 RING Record Book and Boxing Encyclopedia (a few other sources were used). While remaining stats are compliant with BoxRec figures, they are not necessarily reliable. Complete records simply do not exist for all fighters throughout boxing history. This is an extremely old sport and proper record keeping is still relatively new to it. Under the circumstances the following numbers are subject to change (especially those corresponding to fighters still active after November 6, 2014, when this was published).

Lists later updated to reflect results up to November 4, 2015.

Most Consecutive Knockouts

  1. LaMar Clark (44^, 7 straight in round 1)
  2. Billy Fox (43^, 4 straight in round 1)
  3. Don Steele (42, 3 straight in round 1)
  4. George Gunther (40^, 2^ straight in round 1)
  5. Bob Allotey (33^, 5 straight in round 1)
  6. Rodolfo Gonzalez (33, 2 straight in round 1)
  7. Deontay Wilder (32, 8 straight in round 1)
  8. Wilfredo Gomez (32, 2 straight in round 1)
  9. Jimmy Adamick (30, 2 straight in round 1)
  10. Jose Manuel Urtain (30^, 2 straight in round 1)
  11. Alfonso Zamora (29, 2 straight in round 1)
  12. Acelino Freitas (29, 2 straight in round 1)
  13. Jesus Pimentel (28, 3 straight in round 1)
  14. %Carlos Zarate (28, nothing consecutive in round 1)
  15. Charley Parham / Charlie Parnam (28^, ? straight in round 1)
  16. Edwin Valero (27, first 18 in round 1)
  17. Miguel Julio (27, 5 straight in round 1)
  18. Earnie Shavers (27, 3 straight in round 1)
  19. Feliciano Dario Azuaga (27, 3 straight in round 1)
  20. Henry Armstrong (27, nothing consecutive in round 1)
  21. Vitali Klitschko (27, nothing consecutive in round 1)
  22. *William Fernando Souza Bezerra (26, 4 straight in round 1 [within a different streak])
  23. Michael Moorer (26, 3 straight in round 1)
  24. Leonilo Miranda (26, 2 straight in round 1)
  25. Aaron Pryor (26, nothing consecutive in round 1)
  26. In-Chul Baek (26, nothing consecutive in round 1)
  27. Victor Oganov (26, nothing consecutive in round 1)
  28. Ali Raymi (25, first 21 in round 1)
  29. David Quinonero (25, 4 straight in round 1)
  30. John Mugabi (25, 2 straight in round 1)
  31. Earl Hargrove (24, 5 straight in round 1)
  32. Scott Daley (24, 4 straight in round 1)
  33. Alex Stewart (24, 3 straight in round 1)
  34. %Ruben Olivares (24, 2 straight in round 1)
  35. %George Foreman (24, 2 straight in round 1)
  36. Mac Foster (24, 2 straight in round 1)
  37. George Foster (24^, ? straight in round 1)
  38. Jaime Garza (23, 3 straight in round 1)
  39. %Carlos Zarate (23, nothing consecutive in round 1)
  40. Alexander Munoz (23, nothing consecutive in round 1)
  41. Atilio Natalio Caraune (23, nothing consecutive in round 1)
  42. Jorge Monsalvo (23, nothing consecutive in round 1)
  43. Nigel Benn (22, 3 straight in round 1)
  44. Alejandro Garcia (22, 3 straight in round 1)
  45. Herbie Hide (22, 3 straight in round 1)
  46. John Collins (22, 3 straight in round 1)
  47. Phil Jackson (22, 2 straight in round 1)
  48. Jose Bruno (22, 2 straight in round 1)
  49. Julian Jackson (22, nothing consecutive in round 1)
  50. Randall Bailey (21, 6 straight in round 1)
  51. Kenny Klingman (21, 5 straight in round 1)
  52. Edison Miranda (21, 4 straight in round 1)
  53. Eduardo Cruz (21, 4 straight in round 1)
  54. Danny Lopez (21, 3 straight in round 1)
  55. %Ruben Olivares (21, 2 straight in round 1)
  56. Frank Bruno (21, 2 straight in round 1)
  57. Daniel Ponce De Leon (21, 2 straight in round 1)
  58. Ricardo Moreno (21, 2 straight in round 1)
  59. *Gennady Golovkin (21, nothing consecutive in round 1)
  60. Matias Ezequiel Gomez (21, nothing consecutive in round 1)
  61. Marcos Jimenez (21, nothing consecutive in round 1)
  62. Ruben Angel Mino (20, 4 straight in round 1)
  63. Julio Cesar Chavez Sr (20, 2 straight in round 1)
  64. David Lemieux (20, 2 straight in round 1)
  65. Aurelio Herrera (20, nothing consecutive in round 1)
  66. Rodolfo Martinez (20, nothing in round 1)
  67. Tom Sharkey (20^, ? straight in round 1)
  68. Fausto Rodriguez (20^, ? straight in round 1)
  69. Tyrone Brunson (19, all in round 1)
  70. Engels Pedroza (19, 8 straight in round 1)
  71. Mike Tyson (19, 6 straight in round 1)
  72. China Smith (19, 5 straight in round 1)
  73. Eugene Hart (19, 3 straight in round 1)
  74. Jorge Eliecer Julio (19, 2 straight in round 1)
  75. Lucas Martin Matthysse (19, 2 straight in round 1)
  76. Steve Hamas (19, 2 straight in round 1)
  77. Sal Martinez (19, 2 straight in round 1)
  78. Sam Garr (19, 2 straight in round 1)
  79. Andres Sandoval (19, 2 straight in round 1)
  80. Tony Mundine (19, nothing consecutive in round 1)
  81. Duane Bobick (19, nothing consecutive in round 1)
  82. Walter Dario Matthysse (19, nothing consecutive in round 1)
  83. Carlos Ruben Canete (19, nothing consecutive in round 1)
  84. Jose Luis Navarro (19, nothing consecutive in round 1)
  85. Abel Ricardo Laudonio (19, nothing consecutive in round 1)
  86. Al Carter (19, nothing consecutive in round 1)
  87. Alberto Reyes (19, nothing consecutive in round 1)
  88. One-Round Hogan (?, 18^ straight in round 1)
  89. David Rodriguez (18, 13 straight in round 1)
  90. Magomed Abdusalamov (18, 8 straight in round 1)
  91. Primo Carnera (18, 3 straight in round 1)
  92. Jo-el Scott (18, 3 straight in round 1)
  93. Lamont Kirkland (18, 3 straight in round 1)
  94. Edwin Lopez (18, 3 straight in round 1)
  95. Bob Fitzsimmons (18, 2 straight in round 1)
  96. Cleveland Williams (18, 2 straight in round 1)
  97. Julio Ceja (18, 2 straight in round 1)
  98. Dmitry Kudryashov (18, 2 straight in round 1)
  99. Sean O’Grady (18, 2 straight in round 1)
  100. Terry McGovern (18, nothing consecutive in round 1)
  101. Naseem Hamed (18, nothing consecutive in round 1)
  102. Barry McGuigan (18, nothing consecutive in round 1)
  103. %George Foreman (18, nothing consecutive in round 1)
  104. Pascual Perez (18, nothing consecutive in round 1)
  105. Uensal Arik (18, nothing consecutive in round 1)
  106. Elio Diaz (18, nothing consecutive in round 1)
  107. Paul Whittaker (18, nothing consecutive in round 1)
  108. Enrique Esqueda (18, nothing consecutive in round 1)
  109. Tye Fields (17, 14 straight in round 1)
  110. Milton McCrory (17, 5 straight in round 1)
  111. Yunier Dorticos (17, 5 straight in round 1)
  112. Mike Pusateri (17, 4 straight in round 1)
  113. Fernando Vargas (17, 3 straight in round 1)
  114. Saul Montana (17, 3 straight in round 1)
  115. Carlos Gonzalez (17, 3 straight in round 1)
  116. Dairo Esalas (17, 3 straight in round 1)
  117. Roy Jones Jr (17, 2 straight in round 1)
  118. Elmer Ray (17, 2 straight in round 1)
  119. Fulgencio Obelmejias (17, 2 straight in round 1)
  120. Gary Mason (17, 2 straight in round 1)
  121. Jose “Chamaco” Rodriguez (17, 2 straight in round 1)
  122. Andre Purlette (17, 2 straight in round 1)
  123. Carmelo Negron (17, 2 straight in round 1)
  124. Tommy Hearns (17, nothing consecutive in round 1)
  125. Juan Alberto Rosas (17, nothing consecutive in round 1)
  126. Samson Dutch Boy Gym (17, nothing consecutive in round 1)
  127. Richard Commey (17, nothing consecutive in round 1)
  128. Adrian Estrella (17, nothing consecutive in round 1)
  129. Monte Masters (17, nothing consecutive in round 1)
  130. Eder Jofre (17, nothing in round 1)
  131. Nino La Rocca (17, nothing in round 1)
  132. Young Otto (?, 16^ straight in round 1)
  133. *Billy Wright (16, 6 straight in round 1)

Most Consecutive First Round Knockouts

  1. Ali Raymi (21)
  2. Tyrone Brunson (19)
  3. Edwin Valero (18)
  4. One-Round Hogan (18^)
  5. Young Otto (16^)
  6. Tye Fields (14)
  7. David Rodriguez (13)

Most Knockouts

  1. Billy Bird (138, 5 in round 1)
  2. Archie Moore (131, 16 in round 1)
  3. Young Stribling (129, 16 in round 1)
  4. Sam Langford (128, 17 in round 1)
  5. Buck Smith (120, 20 in round 1)
  6. George Odwell (114^, 10 in round 1)
  7. Kid Azteca (114, 4 in round 1)
  8. Sugar Ray Robinson (110^, 21^ in round 1)
  9. Alabama Kid (108, 15 in round 1)
  10. Peter Maher (107, 50 in round 1)
  11. Sandy Saddler (103, 17 in round 1)
  12. Henry Armstrong (101, 7 in round 1)
  13. Joe Gans (100, 5 in round 1)
  14. Jimmy Wilde (99, 3 in round 1)

Most First Round Knockouts

  1. Peter Maher (50)
  2. Young Otto (42^)
  3. *Shannon Briggs (36)
  4. *Bronco Billy Wright (30)
  5. Tiger Jack Fox (30^)
  6. LaMar Clark (28)
  7. Buddy Baer (26)
  8. Tye Fields (26)
  9. Feliciano Dario Azuaga (26)
  10. Jack Dempsey (26^)
  11. Sean O’Grady (25)
  12. David Rodriguez (24)
  13. Mike Tyson (22)
  14. Roberto Duran (21)
  15. Ali Raymi (21)
  16. Sugar Ray Robinson (21^)
  17. Gerald McClellan (20)
  18. *Tyrone Brunson (20)
  19. Buck Smith (20)

*Active
%Fighters that made the ‘Most Consecutive Knockouts’ list multiple times

But which of these fighters should we consider great punchers? Eleven years ago a subjective yet well respected list was made that should provide further insight.

RING Magazine’s 100 Greatest Punchers of All-Time (2003)

  1. Joe Louis (66-3, 52 KOs)
  2. ~Sam Langford (179-30-39, 128 KOs)
  3. ~Jimmy Wilde (132-3-1, 99 KOs)
  4. ~Archie Moore (185-23-10, 131 KOs)
  5. ~Sandy Saddler (144-16-2, 103 KOs)
  6. Stanley Ketchell (51-4-4, 48 KOs)
  7. ~Jack Dempsey (55-6-9, 45 KOs)
  8. ~Bob Fitzsimmons (63-8-4, 59 KOs)
  9. ~George Foreman (76-5, 68 KOs)
  10. ~Earnie Shavers (74-14-1, 68 KOs)
  11. ~Sugar Ray Robinson (173-19-6, 108 KOs)
  12. ~Ruben Olivares (89-13-3, 79 KOs)
  13. ~Wilfredo Gomez (44-3-1, 42 KOs)
  14. Rocky Marciano (49-0, 43 KOs)
  15. Sonny Liston (50-4, 39 KOs)
  16. ~Mike Tyson (50-6, 44 KOs)
  17. Bob Foster (56-8-1, 46 KOs)
  18. ~Thomas Hearns (61-5-1, 48 KOs)
  19. Khaosai Galaxy (47-1, 41 KOs)
  20. Alexis Arguello (77-8, 62 KOs)
  21. ~Carlos Zarate (66-4, 63 KOs)
  22. Max Baer (66-13, 51 KOs)
  23. Rocky Graziano (67-10-6, 52 KOs)
  24. Matthew Saad Muhammad (49-16-3, 35 KOs)
  25. ~Julian Jackson (55-6, 49 KOs)
  26. ~Danny Lopez (42-6, 39 KOs)
  27. ~Gerald McClellan (31-3, 29 KOs)
  28. ~Roberto Duran (103-16, 70 KOs)
  29. Rodrigo Valdes (64-8-2, 43 KOs)
  30. Felix Trinidad (42-3, 35 KOs)
  31. Pipino Cuevas (35-15, 31 KOs)
  32. Jim Jefferies (19-1-2, 16 KOs)
  33. Lennox Lewis (41-2-1, 32 KOs)
  34. Bennie Briscoe (66-24-5, 53 KOs)
  35. Marvin Hagler (62-3-2, 52 KOs)
  36. Edwin Rosario (47-6, 41 KOs)
  37. Tommy Ryan (84-2-11, 70 KOs)
  38. ~John Mugabi (42-7-1, 39 KOs)
  39. Joe Frazier (32-4-1, 27 KOs)
  40. Carlos Monzon (87-3-9, 58 KOs)
  41. Tony Zale (67-18-2, 45 KOs)
  42. Michael Spinks (31-1, 21 KOs)
  43. ~Joe Gans (145-10-16, 100 KOs)
  44. ~Elmer Ray (85-17-5, 64 KOs)
  45. George Godfrey [The Leiperville Shadow] (96-21-2, 78 KOs)
  46. ~Naseem Hamed (36-1, 31 KOs)
  47. ~Alfonso Zamora (33-5, 32 KOs)
  48. David Tua (52-5-2, 43 KOs)
  49. ~Cleveland Williams (78-13-1, 58 KOs)
  50. ~Julio Cesar Chavez (107-6-2, 86 KOs)
  51. ~Tiger Jack Fox (140-23-12, 90 KOs)
  52. (Barbados) Joe Walcott (95-25-24, 61 KOs)
  53. Gerry Cooney (28-3, 24 KOs)
  54. Al (Bummy) Davis (65-10-4, 46 KOs)
  55. Max Schmeling (56-10-4, 40 KOs)
  56. Florentino Fernandez (50-16-1, 43 KOs)
  57. ~Henry Armstrong (150-21-10, 101 KOs)
  58. Bob Satterfield (50-25-4, 35 KOs)
  59. Al Hostak (64-9-11, 41 KOs)
  60. ~Jesus Pimentel (77-7, 69 KOs)
  61. ~Eugene (Cyclone) Hart (30-9-1, 28 KOs)
  62. Lew Jenkins (73-41-5, 51 KOs)
  63. Harry Wills (68-9-3, 54 KOs)
  64. ~Tom Sharkey (37-7-6, 34 KOs)
  65. ~Terry McGovern (59-5-4, 44 KOs)
  66. (Jersey) Joe Walcott (51-18-2, 32 KOs)
  67. Kostya Tszyu (31-2, 25 KOs)
  68. Leotis Martin (31-5, 19 KOs)
  69. Buddy Baer (52-7, 48 KOs)
  70. Donovan (Razor) Ruddock (38-5-1, 29 KOs)
  71. Jose Luis Ramirez (102-9, 82 KOs)
  72. Tommy Gomez (75-9-2, 65 KOs)
  73. Jose Napoles (81-7, 54 KOs)
  74. Charles Kid McCoy (86-7-10, 65 KOs)
  75. Antonio Esparragoza (30-2-4, 27 KOs)
  76. ~Ricardo Moreno (60-12-1, 59 KOs)
  77. Evander Holyfield (44-10-2, 29 KOs)
  78. Ike Williams (127-24-4, 61 KOs)
  79. Luis Angel Firpo (31-4, 26 KOs)
  80. Ricardo Lopez (51-0-1, 38 KOs)
  81. Humberto Gonzalez (43-3, 30 KOs)
  82. Bobby Chacon (59-7-1, 47 KOs)
  83. Jock McAvoy (132-14-1, 88 KOs)
  84. Eduardo Lausse (75-10-2, 62 KOs)
  85. ~Eder Jofre (72-2-4, 50 KOs)
  86. Charley Burley (83-12-2, 50 KOs)
  87. Mike McCallum (49-5-1, 36 KOs)
  88. Salvador Sanchez (44-1-1, 32 KOs)
  89. *~Roy Jones Jr. (59-8, 42 KOs)
  90. ~Rodolfo Gonzalez (80-8-1, 67 KOs)
  91. ~Nigel Benn (42-5-1, 35 KOs)
  92. (Irish) Bob Murphy (65-11-2, 56 KOs)
  93. Paul Berlenbach (40-8-3, 34 KOs)
  94. Battling Torres (57-9, 47 KOs)
  95. Chalky Wright (162-45-19, 83 KOs)
  96. George (K.O.) Chaney (101-21-3, 78 KOs)
  97. Andy Ganigan (34-5, 30 KOs)
  98. Fred Fulton (79-16-2, 70 KOs)
  99. Ingemar Johansson (26-2, 17 KOs)
  100. Charley White (87-16-5, 57 KOs)

~Member of the assorted KO lists

Analysis

Ultimately only 36/100 of the RING rated great punchers made the numerically-great knockout lists produced in this article. But it should also be noted that 17 was a semi-arbitrary KO-streak cutoff. Florentino Fernandez, Rocky Marciano, Al Hostak, Eduardo Lausse, and Andy Ganigan reached 16. Edwin Rosario reached 15. Those extra names bring the count from 36 to 42, which still doesn’t show a strong greatness trend. However, 11 of the top 13 greatest punchers did make the KO lists (85%). It would appear that having amazing stats is more relevant to fighters in the discussion of VERY GREATEST puncher of all time, not the runners-up.

Now let’s take a look at the knockout lists individually.

Most Consecutive KOs

Despite at least 10 fighters having 30 or more consecutive KOs, only 2 are considered great punchers and only 1 is considered great overall. Deontay Wilder might wish to change that someday, but it’s hard to imagine him surpassing the legacy of Rodolfo Gonzalez, a WBC lightweight champion and member of the World Boxing Hall of Fame (WBHF).

Speaking of Gonzalez, he claimed to have won 55 straight bouts and was once tied with his stable-mate Efren Torres at 28 consecutive KOs before Efren’s streak ended. Unfortunately these claims are neither verifiable nor supported by non-conflicted parties.

But that’s neither here nor there.

Most Consecutive 1st Round KOs

It’s hard to take any of the lengthy 1-round KO streaks seriously, although Edwin Valero did prove himself to some extent shortly thereafter (before his homicidal and suicidal tendencies got the better of him). Valero became world champion in 2 weight classes before kicking the bucket, with about 1 world class win in each division (130 – Vicente Mosquera, 135 – Antonio DeMarco). Despite his lack of a resume, Valero was on a short list to fight Manny Pacquiao at the height of Manny’s career…

Most KOs

We know at least 14 fighters have 99+ KOs in their careers and 7 are widely considered great (with a strong argument for Young Stribling to be #8). Two more stand out as quality fighters worthy of special praise (Peter Maher and Kid Azteca). It’s probably safe to say it takes a LOT of manipulation to get mediocre fighters as many KOs as these guys have.

Most 1st Round KOs

The talent spectrum for this list is pretty much all over the place. At the top of the list you have Peter Maher, an incredible fighter with 1-round KOs spanning 4 decades. Maher had notable KO victories over the likes of George Godfrey (Old Chocolate), Joe Choynski, and Joe Goddard. None of those guys bit the dust in round 1 but Steve O’Donnell did in a vacant “world heavyweight title” fight. You see, reigning world heavyweight champion Jim Corbett “retired” and awarded his title to the winner of Maher-O’Donnell. But then Corbett came out of “retirement” and resumed being world champion…

Moving on, the rest of the list is occupied by an urban legend, some frauds, some of the greatest fighters of all time, some of the most famous fighters of all time, some solid champions/contenders, and then there’s Shannon Briggs.

Young Otto beware, “The Cannon” is coming for you. If Wladimir Klitschko doesn’t give Briggs a title shot anytime soon, he’ll just keep knocking over cans and making more YouTube videos.

Briggs was rated #7 by the WBA at the time this article was originally published.

#LetsGoChamp

In conclusion, boxing statistics are often a conundrum. Numerical analyses can predict percentages of fighters that are actually worth a damn but numbers alone won’t point out which fighters specifically fit the bill. Boxing will never have a Bill James (founder of sabermetrics). This ain’t “Moneyball” and I’m damn sure not Jonah Hill!

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Ryan Bivins is a professional boxer, the creator of Sweet Boxing Ratings, and a member of the voting panel for the Pennsylvania Boxing Hall of Fame. You may email him at rgbivins@gmail.com and listen to him Tuesday nights on The Ruckus, part of the BadCulture Radio Network.